Last Day (Not)

It is officially the last day of May and coincidentally, the last day of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome awareness month. It has been a good month and I have been able to connect with many people, illustrating the stark reality that is chronic illness. But we are not done, this is a lifelong fight for awareness – not just one month out of the year. However, in the spirit of awareness, I hereby dedicate this final post to the final day.

Wouldn’t it be so nice if we could go, “Today is the last day of our illness. Tomorrow is the first day of health, happiness and life.”?

I noticed some people in my life do not like discussing depressing prospects. They say things like, “Wow, S. that’s really sad…” and they seem uncomfortable, like maybe I should just stop writing and talking about it. Yes, well living with chronic illness is very sad. It can also be very happy. I need to talk about it, for myself. If you are uncomfortable with the realities of life, which is pain, suffering and death, then perhaps you should reevaluate your position in life and yourself. There is nothing, in my eyes, healthy about turning your back on someone, or some situation because you are uncomfortable with depressing stuff. Life is a mixture of sadness, pain, failure, anger, resentment, but also happiness, success, empathy, love, laughter and greatness.

In any case, I will not stop talking about my life, my illness – the depressing stuff or the successes, happiness, love and laughter.


Quick side bar, I would like to link a really awesome post by a fellow zebra. Her struggle is very different from mine, however, she also suffers from hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. I am linking her post to illustrate the vast differences between patients, even patients with the same type of EDS. You can read it here. She is a young woman, a bit younger than I, who has severe gastrointestinal manifestations in her Ehlers-Danlos, nearly killing her, resulting in feeding tubes and a very limited life. She is UK based and has been writing to share her story and raise awareness about how sinister this genetic disorder can be, especially if left unchecked.


So, as a part of my integrative care for Chiari and Ehlers-Danlos, I started seeing a psychologist. I have already undergone some intensive therapy, spanning over two years, including a couple facilitated support groups. But, in the interest of showing my primary doctor how serious I am about integrative care, I sought out a clinical psychologist to manage the social and psychological implications of living chronically ill. She is an okay psychologist. It isn’t so much that I feel I need to see a therapist at this moment. I am in the best place I have ever been in my life, emotionally, socially and psychologically. But the truth is, living incurably comes with random, unforeseen complications. That is the very nature of both of my conditions.

Anyways, in the second or third appointment, she asked me, “What is it like? Living with these conditions?”. She stared at me, taking a drink from her coffee while waiting patiently for an explanation. I just sort of laughed and stared back at her for a moment. In the previous appointments, I had to tell her my history, including medical. In 2011, I underwent 6 months of self-administered chemotherapy for liver disease (no, not cancer).

So, after thinking for a moment, because I genuinely wanted her to understand, I said “it’s like chemotherapy, that doesn’t end”. She seemed shocked, like as if my previous descriptions of EDS and Chiari had been said in an alien language, or maybe that she thought it wasn’t as bad as it sounded.

“You know, you deal with splitting headaches daily, joint pain daily and random, unprecedented bouts of nausea and even vomiting. Standing up hurts. Sitting down hurts. And you’re just so fucking tired, like you haven’t slept.”

I think she finally got it, when I related it to my experience with chemotherapy.

The description stands true today. But I must admit, my symptoms have actually improved as of late, headache aside.I had an incredibly bad flare in the end of 2013 through the beginning of 2014. I used a cane and I almost never left the house. My husband had to help me shower many days and the pain made me cripplingly depressed. Things began letting up in the summer of 2014 and although it still sucks, it all still hurts, I am not that bad (for now). The reprieve has been nice and finding answers has definitely helped tremendously. Things are still improving, but only because I am finally getting the medical attention I need. My primary prescribed me beta-blockers for the associated autonomic dysfunction and just in the a week of being on this new medication, I am already improving immensely. I am finally sleeping better, my blood pressure and heart rate aren’t doing gymnastics anymore, and I don’t feel like I am going to pass out every time I take a shower. And that is just one facet of my illness being treated. I can’t imagine what will happen when I am under the care of a clinical geneticist. This is great. I can only hope for such improvement when I go to John Hopkins.

Don’t get me wrong, I still have my struggles and I will continue to struggle in the future. You will never be able to ask me, “So are you better now?” and get the answer yes. That will not happen. There is no cure. This is progressive, but my victories are moments like these – moments where it is manageable, moments where I can do things and be happy. I know this summer I will begin to have even more victories, because I will have my brain surgery(ies) needed to alleviate my headache and to slow the progression of the Chiari malformation. Moreover, I will continue to make connections with wonderful, supportive people who do not shy from the gritty-shitty aspects of life.

I have been fortunate since moving to Virginia, especially so. I have made some amazing new friends, some through support groups and some who work with my husband. A special shout out to my best friend from Alaska, you know who you are boob, for always enduring my 2am antics and just wholly loving me, supporting me and of course for always being there, when I needed you the most! Another quick shout out, to Fred, a new connection who can relate in so many ways to the struggle that is Ehlers-Danlos. A new friend who I know will continue to be there and who will endure through the same battle, who displays such astounding empathy and who checks on me regularly!

Finally, my husband who has shown me true strength, compassion, empathy and death-do-us-part love in our marriage. I know I would not have survived, thrived and lived to become the woman I am today without my husband. He stole my heart over six years ago. He gave it back, in better condition than I could have imagined and he has truly endured through the struggles many relationships may never face. He has shown weakness, strength, compassion and he has lifted me up with his love. I am so very lucky to have him in my life.

Today is the last day of Ehlers-Danlos awareness month. But it is not the last day of my illness. It is not the last day of voicing the pain and the victories I have and will face.

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Published by

salvationisadhoc

Occasionally, I write things and stuff. Sometimes they are even witty. I'm stupidly in love with my husband and a crazy cat lady. I have Ehlers-Danlos, Chiari I malformation, postural orthostatic tachycardia and autism. My words are shaped with profanity, wit, and sarcasm, because life is just such a bitch sometimes.

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